BRONNIE WARE THE TOP FIVE REGRETS OF THE DYING PDF

T here was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives.

Author:Mikall Kelkree
Country:Mozambique
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Travel
Published (Last):3 November 2006
Pages:89
PDF File Size:11.12 Mb
ePub File Size:16.27 Mb
ISBN:239-3-63906-809-5
Downloads:95318
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Migal



Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again.

Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Despite having no formal qualifications or experience, she found herself in palliative care. Later, she wrote an Internet blog about the most common regrets expressed to her by "After too many years of unfulfilling work, Bronnie Ware began searching for a job with heart.

Later, she wrote an Internet blog about the most common regrets expressed to her by the people she had cared for. The article, also called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying, gained so much momentum that it was read by more than three million people around the globe in its first year. At the requests of many, Bronnie now shares her own personal story. Bronnie has had a colourful and diverse past, but by applying the lessons of those nearing their death to her own life, she developed an understanding that it is possible for people, if they make the right choices, to die with peace of mind.

In this book, she expresses in a heartfelt retelling how significant these regrets are and how we can positively address these issues while we still have the time. The Top Five Regrets of the Dying gives hope for a better world. It is a story told through sharing her inspiring and honest journey, which will leave you feeling kinder towards yourself and others, and more determined to live the life you are truly here to live.

This delightful memoir is a courageous, life-changing book. Get A Copy. Kindle Edition , pages. Published first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. How can i get this book? Does anyone know where i can buy the ebook in pdf format?

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Mar 14, Deirdre rated it did not like it. I bought this book due to the positive publicity which the writer received on her article the top five regrets of the dying. I expected some open and honest accounts from people who faced death and encountered their regrets about the life they had led and their fears about the future.

What I didn't expect to find was a long diatribe about the author, her belief systems and what led to her writing the book in the first place.

A paragraph should have been sufficient. Sadly it was so interminably d I bought this book due to the positive publicity which the writer received on her article the top five regrets of the dying.

Sadly it was so interminably dull that I couldn't wade through the author's biography to get to the parts about the dying which was the point of buying the book in the first place. For anyone with an interest in this subject I would recommend What Dying People Want by David Kuhl which is a worthwhile and professionally written work.

Sadly struggling to read this drivel by Bronnie Ware counts as one of my top regrets of the living. View all 7 comments.

When I'm dying, one of my top five regrets may well be having read this book. It was like reading a dull person's diary, complete with the bad spelling and grammar you'd expect from such an offering.

This book contained mainly self-indulgent drivel, briefly punctuated by five points of wisdom gleaned from the writer's dying clients while she worked as a palliative carer. Instead of an enriching insight into their experiences and what we could learn from them to use our own remaining time more eff When I'm dying, one of my top five regrets may well be having read this book. Instead of an enriching insight into their experiences and what we could learn from them to use our own remaining time more effectively, the writer consistently went off on tangents about her wannabe music career, bouts of depression and thoughts of suicide, and her experiences teaching female prisoners how to write songs.

This book's title misleads you into thinking it might be worth reading. Even if it contained more content relating to the title I'd still find it difficult to give it much credence, as the woman comes across as a flake. If after reading this you still feel the urge to read the book, let me save you some precious time by suggesting that you just skip to the second last chapter, titled "No Regrets". It sums up all that went before without having to skim over all the other crap in between.

View all 6 comments. Jul 15, Carrie Poppy rated it liked it. The content of this book is lovely, and the author has clearly had a fascinating life, worthy of a memoir; however, she clearly was not given a very skilled editor. While the five major regrets that she witnessed are very telling -- and not always obvious -- Ware is gifted with more insight and compassion than pure writing prowess.

She writes nearly every sentence in the passive voice, sometimes rambles for a page or two, and occasionally veers into the troublingly unscientific she even devot The content of this book is lovely, and the author has clearly had a fascinating life, worthy of a memoir; however, she clearly was not given a very skilled editor.

She writes nearly every sentence in the passive voice, sometimes rambles for a page or two, and occasionally veers into the troublingly unscientific she even devotes a few paragraphs to energy healing herself of an illness she declines to name.

Nevertheless, the book is worth reading for the content, if not the writing itself. In case you were wondering: Regret 1: I wish I'd had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. Regret 2: I wish I hadn't worked so much.

Regret 3: I wish I'd had the courage to express my feelings. Regret 4: I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. Regret 5: I wish that I had let myself be happier. View 1 comment. Feb 18, Anna Lundberg rated it did not like it. Honestly I had to force myself to finish this book. I'm afraid that it's long and poorly written, all tell and no show, and very repetitive. The author has clearly led a very a troubled life, from drug problems in her youth to depression and several suicide attempts or at least plans.

I'm happy for her that she seems finally to have found her own form of peace and happiness, and in a way I think the book is a kind of therapy for her. She has also had rare insight into the regrets of the d Hmm. She has also had rare insight into the regrets of the dying, having worked in palliative care with many "dear" men and women. Read them, think about what they mean, and try to live your life to avoid such regrets. But beyond that, I wouldn't recommend that you read this book Mar 20, Debbie Young rated it really liked it Recommends it for: anyone struggling with work-life balance - so that'll be most of us, then!

I bought this book Kindle Version having read brief but rave reviews about it on Facebook and it wasn't quite what I'd expected the perils of buying on Kindle rather than flicking through a printed book in a shop! Ware breaks the last taboo by talking so much about death, recounting her personal experiences of providing palliative care and witnessing many people's final I bought this book Kindle Version having read brief but rave reviews about it on Facebook and it wasn't quite what I'd expected the perils of buying on Kindle rather than flicking through a printed book in a shop!

Ware breaks the last taboo by talking so much about death, recounting her personal experiences of providing palliative care and witnessing many people's final moments. Doing this work she is battling with her own past demons and moving towards a future in which she can embrace her own life with more enthusiasm never mind death! It is a deeply honest and frank account that must have been hard to write - and it's good to see that eventually she is able to come to terms with her own life after being on the verge of suicide.

Visit her Facebook page now and you'll see that she's effectively now on maternity leave from it, and very happy to have just had her first child. Things don't get much more life-affiriming than that! And as for those top five regrets - the reasons the I bought the book in the first place - they are eloquently, convincingly and touchingly argued.

But I'm not going to list them here - buy the book yourself if you want to know what they are! I expect she could do with the extra royalties to cover that maternity leave! Jan 09, Amy Moritz rated it really liked it. A very interesting book. This book was recommended to me by a friend and I just jumped in without knowing much more than the title.

At times it was wonderful and at times I felt as if it interrupted the story. But overall an incredibly beautiful reminder and message. Two regrets struck me most. One was from people who wished they had the courage to be themselves, to be true to themselves. This is a theme which comes around in my li A very interesting book. This is a theme which comes around in my life very often, and a message I need to take to heart.

DESCARGAR EL AYUNO DEL SEOR YIYE AVILA PDF

Regrets of the Dying

Funerals inspire me. They always have. I have attended several significant funerals particularly meaningful to me. I can remember the details and the stories well.

DONALD DEPAMPHILIS PDF

Top five regrets of the dying

Ware first shared the insights in a blog post, "Regrets of the Dying". In Ware expanded her blog post into a book memoir, The Top Five Regrets of the Dying , which was translated into 27 languages. According to Bronnie Ware, the five most common regrets shared by people nearing death were: [5] [6]. A study reached similar conclusions, finding that people were more likely to express "ideal-related regrets", such as failing to follow their dreams and live up to their full potential.

ENVIRONMENTAL ACOUSTICS DOELLE PDF

The Top Five Regrets of the Dying: A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing

For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality.

Related Articles